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the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyway we are pleased to have this occasion and have a discussion about the subjects that are in the book for foreign policy. [applause] >> thank you steve. you instrumental to make this project have been. also oxford university press that published the book and also to my:editor catherine and the people here at the foundation also jonathan who helped to make the book possible. the reason it was necessary storming off the
on a speech from washington or somebody's affair or not. it was love of the man next to you, and it's a cliche that guys jump out of the trench and run forward because of the guy to their left and right, but just because it's a cliche doesn't keep it from being true. so questions like that, i focused on he small, small part i could do something about. >> i'd echo that. the war is as small as the war for you. it's not how did you get there it's there you are, for almost every troop. and general expressing an opinion is maybe something we could use more of. what that point is it something we can't gauge. i think overall worry is if somebody is hiding so much, how much are the hiding? how much of everything is true because its an level of such high discussion. where the effect is you have to diffuse the bomb and keep 150 marines from being dead that day. does he notice? does anyone really notice? it comes down to the warrior detachment and living in a surreality, how much of the war is real to anyone not actively engaged in it on the ground. >> i'm not a veteran. but i see myself as something of
to a philadelphia that was filled with the ayaan clich hans, quakers, jews, slaves and being a shopkeeper on market street he had to be open and tolerant and be part of a society from its diversity and you see that when he forms his club of tradesmen and artisans in philadelphia and with a look at the train you need to be a good citizen he lists all of those industry and honesty shines it around to the other people on the market street showing how well he has mastered each of the virtues of the leather apron quote said franklin, you are actually missing a virtue you might want to practice. he says what's that? and then a friend says hugh levity. you might want to try that for a change. what i love about franklin is he said i was never good at the virtue of you devotee. i could never master it. but i could master the pretense of humility very well. the pretense of his devotee is just as useful for the reality of you devotee. to listen to the person next to you yet made you try to find that common ground we all share certain values. so from his life with his you know that the and pretense of humility
to pull together and all had to be together and keep being together. you know, the most obvious cliche that comes to mind, and he would have put it more articulately and more memorably is to not let the perfect be the enemy of the good, not miss the forest for the trees. these are not the most innovating or exciting sort of messages, but it's very important to have a few people at or near the top of the conservative movement's leadership who believe in and preach these things and who ask people, ask their fellow activists and conservative intellectuals to remain focused on the need to win a majority of the american people and to govern. "national review," as a very intellectual magazine throughout its existence -- and i think probably even more so in its early years, the '50s and '60s -- very much needed, i think, bill buckley, managing editor priscilla buckley and every other major person there acknowledged that they very much needed a man just like bill rusher to serve as a political eyes and ears, as a political counselor, as a link between "national review"-type people. as rusher t
--i mean, the human element, in a fresh way without dredging up a lot of cliches. c-span: where do you live now, by the way? >> guest: right now, i'm a visiting writer in residence at memphis, university of memphis. c-span: memphis university? >> guest: yes. c-span: when did you first know that you liked writing? >> guest: well, as i say, in high school, i was writing science fiction. i was--excuse me... c-span: so in school itself? >> guest: yeah. well, it was something i just did. i never thought of it as a profession or even a trade. i just sort of did it and... c-span: did you ever have a point where a teacher came up and said, 'randall, this is good'? >> guest: actually, my teachers were fairly critical of my writing up to a point. i--really, it was in college when i started taking it a little more seriously and--i mean, i--again, i'd been writing very, you know, pitiful stories and i fell under the tutorship of one max steele, who was a--the--ran the writing program at chapel hill for a long time, and he challenged a lot of my ideas about taste and source material, and he sort of knew
right, and i think that falls in the phase zero. you have to have skip in the game, i know it's a cliche, but if you're not there present, then the asians question extraordinarily why you're going to come in when the stakes get much higher, and they don't even need to think out to the existential question of soviet -- chinese icbms just hoping for the good old days hoping things were much clearer, chinese icbms raining down on them and does the nuclear umbrella still hold? as you point out, we've already been doing offshore balancing even while being present because we've had the filipinos, the japanese come to us in these territorial disputes and say are you backing us up, and what are you doing? the administration's response has been we take no position on sovereignty issues, we want to see the status quo maintained, but it's up to you to solve it. now i think, ironically, the right position. it's not for us to defend ya pap's territory, but it is for us to understand how the balance of power in the region is changing, and by not reacting we are changing the actions of our allies. and
's make an clich if you don't mind. >> kneal franklin, director of law enforcement in prohibition. we hear a lot about leadership. steve said something about leadership and since you talked about this as we have no leadership there is this an opportunity for the president, and what is the president's latitude? i know the executive branch enforcement but what is the president's latitude, and what can he do, what can the white house do and what should he do? i'm hoping these answers get to him. >> let's go to the gentleman. we also have a couple tweets. >> i'm with the governing magazine. i want to go back to the broad federalism issue which i talked to several people that said as much as jonathan, that between gay marriage, the affordable care act and marijuana were kind of redefining federalism in a lot of ways or we could be. so i wanted to ask you and i know this is intentional, but what are the potential ramifications for the system of government depending on how the various the dates are put out? >> i love how we saved a little questions for the end. >> ashley from l.a. is asking how m
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7